Gregor on Ashtanga Dispatch

– if yoga wants to help heal societal and personal problems, then it must become a vehicle for dismantling hierarchical structures.
– any relationship between teacher and student that is trying to convey some of the messages of the higher chakras, must transform that relationship as well. The model of teachers clinging to power and their own supremacy, has marred religion of the past 10,000 years.
– Cult psychology and sociology
– Projecting mysterious powers on the teacher as replicating our relationship to our primary carer in early childhood
– The healing quality of touch and the beauty of the Ashtanga system

Ashtanga Parampara or Brand?

A thought-provoking article from Guy Donahaye, editor of “Guruji – A Portrait Through the Eyes of his Students”. Guy reflects on whether we are really looking at a spiritual lineage or rather a cleverly marketed family business.

Monica on Ashtanga Dispatch

Anxiety comes because we aren’t trusting. And I know it’s a scary thing to trust – but there actually is one thing in our lives that we can trust – and it’s in our own heart. So you can’t get closer and more intimate than that. You don’t have to trust everything out in the world, but you need to be able to connect inside and learn to trust your heart. And maybe that’s one of the beauties of age is that you become so much more secure in that.

Mula Bandha Elusive no More

I have repeatedly been asked to shed some light onto the “elusive bandhas”. I’m surprised that they are still considered elusive. In this article I am focussing on Mula Bandha. Mula Bandha has three aspects, layers or phases of which the first is introductory, the second intermediate, the third advanced. To learn the bandhas students should first focus on the introductory aspect and then move on. The introductory aspect, layer or phase of the bandha is gross/muscular.

Ashtanga is Not the Problem, How it’s Taught is – Part 1

One of my biggest frustrations with being associated with Ashtanga Yoga is that other yogis perceive that my asana practice and thereby the asana I teach must adhere to what is known as the ‘traditional’ form (I place tradition here in inverted comas to refer to the popular Jois tradition and not the traditional Patanjali Ashtanga Yoga, which is actually what I do practice and teach!). And many have a negative impression of this ‘tradition’.

Anneke Lucas’ story

Today I want to honor the woman who blew the whistle on sexual abuse in Ashtanga-culture, Anneke Lucas. As Beryl Bender Birch recently said in a podcast even back in the 1980’s everybody knew about Jois’ actions. While everybody knew and few confronted Jois, it took one very brave person to be the first to publicly write about it and thus initiate a platform on which more women can now speak out.